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Did You Know ?

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Affairs' started by Neophyte, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    Hacking a child's Ride-On Toy to hit 40mph may be hazardous to your health.

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    The fellows from YouTube’s 'The Real Life Guys' upgraded a simple ride-on toy with a 15 horsepower engine that can accelerate it to over 40 mph in less than three seconds. With the addition of that beefy electric motor, some reinforced wheels, and a set of handlebars strapped to its tiny steering wheel, it suddenly became a toy for kids who no longer live with their parents.

    And here is the entire thrilling video ...


     
    curiousFred, Neophyte and Brutus58 like this.
  2. Brutus58

    Brutus58 Trusted.Member

    Idle hands do the devil's work. Or maybe too much beer. Could be both. Anyway it does make for entertaining video.
     
    curiousFred likes this.
  3. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    This levitating beer glass will literally take your glassware to the next level !

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    It's called the 'Levitating X Beer Cup' - and it uses a wireless, rechargeable magnetic base to keep your beer glass floating for up to 10 hours.

    The cup is made from dishwasher safe, shatterproof faux-glass, and you can use it for beer, wine, cocktails, coffee, or any other beverage. A bargain for two hundred bucks.
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Brutus58

    Brutus58 Trusted.Member

    Hope they take Monopoly money.
     
  5. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    If you spin a ball as you drop it, it will fly ...

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    It's thanks to something called the Magnus Effect. This occurs when the air on the front side of a spinning object is going in the same direction as its spin, which means it gets dragged along with the object and deflected back, generating thrust.

    For example, if you have watched a good tennis player hit spin shots, or a soccer player curve the ball, you have seen this effect in action.

    Here is a video showing how it all works ...

     
  6. pussycat

    pussycat Moderator Staff Member

    Or me on the golf course.

    Not intentionally.

    :(
     
  7. Neophyte

    Neophyte Moderator Staff Member

    The most dangerous place on the golf course when I hit is the sand traps.:D
     
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  8. pussycat

    pussycat Moderator Staff Member

    With me, its usually the ducks that are in danger

    or the odd fish

    :eek:
     
    curiousFred, Zarp and Neophyte like this.
  9. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    Honeybees let out a ‘woop’ when they bump into each other ...

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    In the 1950s, researchers noticed that this signal was often followed by bees exchanging food, and hypothesised that it was a request for food. Later, it was shown that the signal was produced when one bee tried to inhibit another from performing a waggle dance – a behaviour that tells other bees where to forage.

    Nowadays, however, scientists think that this vibrational pulse might actually be an expression of surprise. Martin Bencsik and colleagues at Nottingham Trent University in the UK used accelerometers to record vibrations inside hives over the course of a year. Then they used software to scan the recordings and identify the signal.

    “We suggest that, in the majority of instances, it is bees being startled that produce the signal,” says Bencsik. The team propose that instead of the 'stop' signal, it should be called the 'wooping' signal.


    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2121275-honeybees-let-out-a-whoop-when-they-bump-into-each-other/
     
  10. jillicious

    jillicious Incestuous Story Writer

    Ever wonder why the solar system flat?

     
  11. Janet

    Janet Trusted.Member

    Age when WW2 ended = Historic fact - has nothing to do with incest.
     
  12. Janet

    Janet Trusted.Member

    Physics question ---- What alloys of two common elements are extraterrestrial spacecraft constructed of?
     
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  13. Curmudgeon

    Curmudgeon Administrator Staff Member

    @Janet, the context doesn't matter. Mentioning an age under 18 is not allowed, period.
    The moderator did exactly what was expected of him.
    You have been warned before about staying out of staff business.
     
  14. Neophyte

    Neophyte Moderator Staff Member

    Using this list my eye color is black.
     
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  15. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    A total guess, but I think that gallium would be useful.
     
  16. Janet

    Janet Trusted.Member

    Iron and aluminum. As in thin very shiny foils recovered from crash debris that can't be torn.
     
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  17. Janet

    Janet Trusted.Member

    Can you spell L-A-M-E B-L-O-G ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 11, 2018
  18. Curmudgeon

    Curmudgeon Administrator Staff Member

    Some people just can't take a hint. @Janet, can you spell Y-O-U A-R-E B-A-N-N-E-D?
     
  19. Neophyte

    Neophyte Moderator Staff Member

    Iron does not alloy well with aluminum. They have different melting temperatures and specific gravity's. If you were able to control the temperature well enough to get them both in a liquid phase at the same time, aluminum floats on top of iron. In order to get them to stay mixed it has to be done in a zero-g environment in agitation chamber. Also an alloy of iron and aluminum is very volatile.
     
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  20. Insp Gadget

    Insp Gadget Trusted.Member

    The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living structure on Earth.

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    Coral reefs consist of huge numbers of individual coral polyps – soft-bodied, invertebrate animals – linked by tissue.

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    The Great Barrier Reef is an interlinked system of about 3000 reefs and 900 coral islands, divided by narrow passages, just beneath the surface of the Coral Sea. Spanning more than 2000 km and covering an area of some 350 000 sq km, it is the largest living structure on Earth, and the only one visible from space.